Wednesday, 20 May 2015

Sparkle Stripy Brimmed Beanie

I've always made my crochet hats from the top down, and felt I simply had to do some sort of creative stitch at the end to tidy it up. I decided to try starting from the bottom with a stretchy and “knit-effect” brim. 
The result was fantastic! I am super happy with this beanie, and the best part is you can size it to fit just about anyone with no other tools than a measuring tape!



Neat, huh? I actually bought this yarn with a totally different project in mind, but unfortunately it didn't have the right kind of drape. However, the colour changes are practically magical in that they seem to change at even intervals around the hat with absolutely no pattern alterations from me! 
The method is very straightforward, and may require minor jigging by yourself with nothing but your measuring tape!

Don't forget to "Hook It" on Ravelry, or add it to your queue!

Materials:
  • 1 skein of King Cole Shine DK (any colourway is fine, I went with Lava)
  • Size 5mm hook. 
  • Darning needle. 
  • Scissors.

Abbreviations:

Ch - chain 
Dc - double crochet 
St(s) stitch(es) 
Sl st - slip stitch 
Dc2tog - double crochet two together 
Sc - single crochet 

Instructions: 

For the brim - firstly use a measuring tape to get the circumference of your head. Head size and hair thickness can vastly alter the size of brim needed while not affecting the shape of the actual hat. This measurement is exactly how long your brim needs to be before you join it. The brim will be quite stretchy, so very little extra will need to be added to ensure comfort. 

Row 1: Ch 12, sc in 3rd ch from hook, and in each ch after (should have 10 ch).
Row 2-90 (approx): Ch 1, sc in front loop only for all sts.

Break yarn, leaving a tail long enough to sew both ends together. 

For the hat - to start with, re-attach your yarn at any point (a little before the leftover tail from your sewing is a good point to start, as this gives you the option to stitch over it, concealing it and weaving it in in the process). Chain one and HDC in the same space. Perform an even series of HDCs around the brim of the hat and join with a sl st to the first HDC. If you look closely at the brim edge, you will see that every second row has a rather prominent gap with just one piece of yarn as a bridge - aim to get one of your HDCs into each of these, and the others should be directly between these! The amount of HDCs you perform will vary depending on the overall length of your brim.

Row 1-4: Ch 2, 1 dc in each st around, join with sl st to first dc.
Row 5: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 7 sts, repeat from * to end (if you have any remaining sts after ending with your 7 sts, work them as normal).
Row 6: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 6 sts, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 7: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 5 sts, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 8: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 4 sts, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 9: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 3 sts, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 10: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next 2 sts, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 11: Ch 2, *dc2tog (one in same space as ch 2), 1 dc in next st, repeat from * to end, join with sl st to first dc (work remaining sts as normal).
Row 12: Ch 2, dc2tog around, join with sl st to first dc2tog.

Break yarn, leaving enough of a tail to weave through the remaining stitches, pull tight (double weave if necessary).


There you have it! A nice, snug and sparkly beanie with a trendy knit-effect brim! As you can see, the yarn changes casually every second row, which almost gives the appearance of changing yarns, without all the messy weaving and cutting. Adding rows where you simply dc across will add length to the hat, giving it a more slouched style. Casting on more stitches when making the brim will also make the brim thicker (coming further down the forehead).